real estate

Homeowner's Insurance Cost

Homeowner’s Insurance: A Guide to Your First Policy

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While homeowner’s insurance cost is always a major factor, there are other important things to look at as you purchase your first policy. In fact, many insurance and real estate professionals state that focusing only on homeowner’s insurance cost can cause trouble if a major disaster strikes and property insurance is to be relied upon for reimbursement. Let’s look at steps you can take to avoid future issues.

Get Enough Homeowners Insurance

homeowner's insurance costs

Being underinsured is a big problem. If you insure your home for $200,000 but it costs more than that amount to restore everything to pre-disaster status, you can find yourself with a costly problem. Work with your agent make sure that your home is totally covered for replacement cost. Sometimes the extra premium amount to do this is minimal, but if construction costs have risen since you first bought your insurance, a hurricane, tornado or fire can present you with a big bill to restore your premises, even after insurance has paid its share.

Deductibles: What Does That Really Mean?

Homeowners Insurance Deductibles

Your deductible is the amount of money you have to pay toward a claim before your insurance kicks in. Simply, if you have $5000 in roof damage due to a covered peril like hail, but you have a $1000 deductible, your insurance will pay only $4000 and you’re stuck with the rest of the bill.

Furthermore, deductibles used to be expressed in monetary terms like $250, $500, or $1000. Now, it is more common for deductible limits that are equal to a percentage of your home’s value. So, on a $300,000 home, a tiny-looking one percent deductible amount would actually be a whopping $3000.

Discounts on Homeowners Insurance Cost

Do check for discounts since the combination of auto and homeowner’s policies can get you a great break on homeowner’s insurance cost. There are also discounts available for fire protection, security systems, remote security solutions, and even wind-resistant shutters in some areas.

Customization of Your Policy

Customized Homeowner's Insurance

The flood damage experts at BMS CAT told us that, “there are some policies in some areas that do not cover every peril like floods. In fact, true flood damage is usually not covered, so if you live in a flood-prone area, you may be able to purchase FEMA flood insurance, although this isn’t cheap.” Also, watch out for stingy insurance company history. Sometimes insurance companies fight about water entering a home. They may consider it an uninsured flood event, while you may maintain that the water was wind-driven rain. Check with your agent on this.

Video for Proof

Finally, take a video of all of your belongings and upload the files to a cloud-based server. That way, your record of exactly what you own will be preserved. Also, make sure you disclose special possessions like jewelry and musical instruments as these may have to be “scheduled,” or you may even have to buy a separate personal articles policy in order to ensure coverage.

Insurance Claims for Home

Image source: ValuePenguin

If you thought that your days of carefully vetting documents were over when your purchase offer was accepted, think again, personal finance is more complicated than that. Your homeowner’s insurance policy is your lifeline to security, so remember to spend time choosing the proper policy, and don’t base your decision totally on homeowner’s insurance cost. Also, be sure to read up on the best personal finance books, so that you know exactly what you’re reading!

As always, feel free to contact us with any questions!

Contract for Deed Homes: What Realtors NEED To Know

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There are a number of reasons Minnesota residents looking to buy contract for deed homes have had success. But you might ask: why not just buy your home with a traditional mortgage from the bank? Let’s talk about that.

We’ve all had it happen. 

Loan Rejection

After a difficult and protracted negotiation period, you finally got both your buyer and the seller to agree on price, contingencies, and before-closing repairs. At the end, everyone came to their senses, gave a up a little, and all parties were looking forward to closing.

Then the bank stepped in and killed the deal. Even though your buyer was pre-qualified, they made a mistake, didn’t follow your instructions and decided to finance an expensive vehicle. As the bank did a final credit check, the new car loan appeared and skewed the buyer’s debt to income ratio. The deal was dead, but you could have brought it back to life.

Contract for Deed Homes

Image result for home buying process

Contract for deed is a widely accepted Minnesota financing tool where a seller finances the property purchase on an installment basis, and they buyer receives the deed upon making the final payment. Many think that for this to work they need to find free and clear properties where a seller agrees to be the bank.

Why free and clear?

Because sellers can’t usually sell encumbered properties without breaching the lender’s mortgage contract. Therefore, those interested in contract for deed financing look specifically for contract for deed homes. There is another way, however.

Companies Like the Contract for Deed Crew (Yes, that’s us!)

There are quality companies out there like C4D, and it works like this: You bring a deal to C4D. Like a bank, C4D analyzes the deal to ensure that the seller can make the required monthly payments.

Unlike a bank, however, C4D can look past problems like the vehicle purchase mentioned above. With a good contract for deed homes company, you will be dealing with the company owner—not a bureaucratic bank loan officer. If C4D approves the deal, they will buy the property.

They do this with a bank loan, but the company’s bank does not include a due-upon-sale clause in its mortgage to C4D. Therefore, C4D legally and ethically buys the home, and with the bank’s blessing, C4D sells it on a contract for deed to the buyer.

Contract for Deed Homes

Benefits to the Realtor using Contract for Deed

  • You can explain difficult situations to C4D and they will understand. A debt to income ratio that has recently changed can be worked with if the buyers can legitimately afford the home.
  • Contract for deed revives dead deals. Banks can be arbitrary and unforgiving, but with a contract for deed transaction, the seller has more leeway to analyze what really makes the buyer worthy.
  • While a down payment is needed, the actual percentage is not necessarily set, and there are even ways the contract for deed companies can facilitate payment assistance.
  • Buyers can look at any home—not just contract for deed homes. With a MN contract for deed sale, the seller is unaffected since a company like C4D is the only purchaser they need to deal with.
  • All real estate commissions are protected.
  • Sellers can move their homes more expediently because companies like C4D have lots of buyers waiting for their dream homes.

Also, if you’re looking to understand property value event more, check out this presentation:

Presentation courtesy of LoseTheAgent, a listing platform for homes for sale by owner.

Don’t let loan officers and finicky banks get in your way. Consider using MN contract for deed for any deal where the lender is causing you trouble. It’s worth an email!

Real Estate Terminology Explained

26 Real Estate Terms Defined for New Buyers

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Buying real estate can be complicated, and some of the real estate terminology can be confusing. Be sure to refer to this comprehensive guide when you need some clarification.

Real Estate Terminology

1) Adjustable rate mortgage

As opposed to a fixed rate instrument, your actual interest rate can move up and down at pre-determined intervals according to whatever index it is associated with.

2) Amortization schedule

A chart that shows exactly how much of your monthly payment is applied to principal, and how much is applied to interest.

3) Appraisal

An independent accounting of what a property is worth. Lenders will require to this to make sure the home they are financing is worth the loan amount.

4) Assessed value

What taxing authorities say your home is worth. This can be changed annually.

5) Buyer’s Agent

A real estate professional that represents the prospective buyer and is therefore entitled to part of the sale commission.

6) Closing

The meeting where the deal is finalized. Money is usually transferred that day or the next day.

7) Closing costs

These are the loan processing and various other costs that can equal two to five percent of the home’s purchase price.

8) Contingencies

Contract clauses that can allow either party to exit from a deal. An example is contract section that explains if the buyer cannot get financing within a certain period of time, the deal is off.

9) Equity

The difference between the market value of your home and any loans you have against it.

10) Escrow

An account that certain monies like down payments are placed into pending closing a deal. After the loan is closed, banks often require insurance and tax payments to be escrowed also.

11) Fixed-rate mortgage

A mortgage rate that can’t change no matter what happens to subsequent mortgage rates.

12) Home warranty

Usually purchases from a third party, these instruments help pay for problems after the sale has been consummated.

13) Inspection

Done by an independent person, this process checks the house for problems that may have to be addressed before the sale.

14) Interest

The price you pay for money expressed as a yearly percentage. This is an important piece of real estate terminology that you must understand.

15) Listing Agent

In a transaction, the seller’s agent.

16) Mortgage broker

A third party that finds appropriate lenders for buyers.

17) Offer

The legal document that spells out the buyer’s proposed terms of purchase.

18) Pre-approval

Buyers can go to the lender, present financial information, and get pre-approved for a loan. Pre-approval is not usually binding, however.

19) Principal

The amount of money that needs to be financed after your down-payment has been subtracted. This seems like a simple, easy to understand piece of real estate terminology, but make sure you fully understand this concept before searching for a home.

20) Private mortgage insurance

Insurance that the buyer pays for in monthly payments. It protects the lender against default.

21) Real estate agent

Someone with a real estate license who has passed certain exams and who works with a real estate broker. This should be a very familiar term to many; because whether you’re buying a home in Minnesota or renting an apartment in affordable Eugene, Oregon, it’s likely that you’ve worked with an agent. 

22) Real estate broker

Someone that has met certain requirements and who hires agents to work for him or her.

23) Realtor

A real estate agent that is a member of the National Association of Realtors (NAR). NAR has ethical and business standards that members must follow.

24) Refinancing

Restructuring a home loan to get a more reasonable rate or pull equity money out.

25) Title insurance

A policy that both sellers and buyers must purchase that protects that parties in a transaction against title deficiencies.

26) Contract for Deed

A unique process widely used in Minnesota that, when used correctly, can allow those that have been denied credit a real chance at home ownership.

As you can see, real estate terminology can be tricky, but by becoming familiar with this list, you’ll have a better understanding of what’s going on during your deal.

why real estate agents fail

9 Tips to Put Your Realtor Career Back on Track

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If you’re a successful MN Realtor, you may not often ask why real estate agents fail. If your career has stalled, however, check out these nine tips to help you get back on track.

Don’t Get Complacent

Failing Realtor Easy Job

First, we have to warn you to be aware of how your market works. Did you know that 93 percent of real estate deals are done by on seven percent of your colleagues? In other words, you may be one of the large group of agents that are fighting for seven percent of the business. Don’t ever think that times are so good that you will always have enough business, because a bad economy can knock you down in a hurry. To be better positioned for a downturn, and to help you be the best you can be, follow these guidelines:

Back to Basics

You don’t have a “normal” job — you have a lifestyle. You have to learn how to use the best productivity apps to get things in motion. Plus, it’s all about you, and if prospective clients don’t like you for any reason, they will go elsewhere. Cultivate and develop your personal brand and realize that it’s your job to make clients happy; while you’re in it for the money, that money will flow faster if you put your clients’ needs first. Treat your clients right and you won’t need to spend your spare time taking paid online surveys for extra bucks.

Remember — this can be one of the greatest careers on earth (just click play below and find out why).

It IS Your Job

So your contract says the clients have to prepare for an open house, and when you get there, you see a mess in the kitchen with a load of dirty dishes. Great Realtors step in and fix the issue without lecturing the client or referring back to the contract. Do whatever it takes to get the job done.

Respect the Big Picture

A string of unclosed deals doesn’t mean you are a failure. If you really want to know why real estate agents fail, one reason is that that they become mired in a few deals that have not closed. Your next listing will turn out better!

You Can’t Cancel

Clients can cancel meetings, but you can’t. Always be where you say you are going to be, and don’t be late. Client-facing time is invaluable, so don’t waste any opportunities.

Don’t Over Promise

A Realtor had a lead on a condo listing. He told the client, “OK, I’ll be there with my maintenance guy and my lead painter. We’ll tell you exactly what you need to do to get your unit ready for sale.” When the Realtor met the client at the property, the agent was alone, and said, “Sorry, my guys were stuck on another job and couldn’t make it.” No client wants to hear the words, Well, what had happened was…” This Realtor instantly lost his credibility.

Learn How Marketing Works Today

Real Estate Marketing

You can’t just read an AdWords article and expect to be able to do a proper AdWords campaign. Learn what your Facebook page needs to look like in order to be effective. Do you know what social media really consists of? Do you have an up-to-date website? If you move slowly in a fast-paced world, you’ll quickly find out why real estate agents fail.

Be Available

Some clients like to talk by phone. Others prefer email. Some like to text. Some use platforms like Slack to instant message. Can you do all of this stuff correctly and efficiently?

Know Your Market

Real Estate Market Trends

That’s a no-brainer, right? Check this out: You just sold a big suburban home for a wealthy client, but they have a campus-area four-family that they want to get out of. You took the listing, but frankly, you know nothing about that area of town. If you don’t want to be on the list of why real estate agents fail, make sure you do your homework quickly and learn that neighborhood, or you may be a one hit wonder.

All businesses and careers have rough patches. Make sure you can get through bad times by getting back to the basics and ensuring that you are consistent  and well-liked by your clients. And remember, just as good times don’t last forever, a period of slower sales will improve if you are diligent.

Mortgage Loan Denial: Is This A Racial Problem?

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So, you need a down payment on a house, but you do not have handfuls and handfuls of cash to make it happen. A mortgage loan can help with that, but what if you can’t get one?

Well, many persons think that race and ethnicity are major factors in mortgage loan denials, and the following chart backs this up:

Down Payment on a House - Mortgage Denial

Others, however, feel that observed denial rates do not give the true picture, and that what is called “real” denial rates paint a truer picture:

Mortgage Denial Reporting

According to Urban Wire, “the real denial rate is still a blunt tool, because it requires the simplification of complex data and trends. It considers credit scores, loan-to-value ratios, debt-to-income ratios (DTI), and product and documentation types, but it does not consider income or income variability (we only have access to DTI; the lender will have more detailed financial information).”

Mortgage Loan Denial: Racial Profiling?

Statistics can be molded to show whatever authors want them to show, and both charts seem to portray that more minorities are denied mortgages than whites. Of course, there could be many reasons for this, and the raw data just does not tell us what that is.

Some think, however, that if a person of color walks into a mortgage lender’s office—even if they have a down payment on a house–the would-be borrower is automatically subjected to a higher level of scrutiny that then causes them to become credit denied. While this can be possible, these anomalies don’t guide the way we do business at C4D.

Down Payment on a House: We Can Help

Whether you are Asian, white, black, Hispanic or a Native American, we just don’t care. We know that good people can simply have bad credit problems. We understand that your credit rating may have been injured because:

  • You lost a job within the last year.
  • You have a lot of student loan debt.
  • Your credit cards are maxed out.
  • You got a divorce.
  • You owe taxes to the state.
  • You have legal judgments against you.
  • You declared Chapter 13 or Chapter 7 bankruptcy.
  • You defaulted on a personal loan.
  • You faced foreclosure.
  • You don’t have a large enough down payment on a house.

There can be many other reasons that you may not qualify for traditional financing, but we at C4D are here to help you. We utilize a very innovative program called MN contract for deed. It works like this:

  • You find a house.
  • We buy it.
  • We sell it to you on a MN contract for deed basis.
  • We keep the deed until you make all of your payments.

Yes, you still will need a down payment on a home, but we consider things that a bank does not.

Our Process to Help with Your Down Payment on a House

Down Payment Assistance

Fill out our online application, and we will evaluate your situation. If there is any way we can help you, we will first talk on the phone, and then we will get together personally. We do work with a local bank, and the bank respects our judgment. If we can make a good case that you have a down payment on a house and that you will be able to make the payments, we do everything possible to get the deal done.

We have said it before:  We love traditional financing and wish that everyone could get a standard mortgage. If you can’t, however, don’t give up. Talk to us today!

Signs of a bad realtor

7 Things Real Estate Agents Must Do For Sellers

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You need to be able to spot the signs of a bad Realtor when you see them. It’s a must!

Signs of a bad realtor

You can be paying big money to your listing broker when your home sells. If your property goes for $400,000, brokers could get $24,000. Sure, the listing broker will share commissions with the buyer’s agent, but still, that’s a lot of money. Because your Realtor is going to handsomely profit from his or her work, you can expect your agent to do the following.

Signs of a Bad Realtor #1: Doesn’t Correctly Price the Home

Your agent needs to have total local market knowledge and needs to know the price range where your home will sell. There is nothing worse than riding down the market as buyers wait for you to continually lower the listing amount of your over-priced home. Don’t think that Joe Smith—the guy that sold grandma’s condo in the suburbs—is automatically going to know how much your downtown unit is worth, unless he can prove that he understands your local market.

Signs of a Bad Realtor #2: Doesn’t Do A Great Marketing Job

Your expert should not be showing signs of a bad Realtor. Instead, they should use every available too to sell your home. Facebook, MLS of course, Craigslist, his or her network of brokers, Pinterest and any other Internet based platforms need to be used. Any postings and listings must be accompanied by great photos and excellent descriptions. If you have already moved, and your property is vacant, your agent needs to help you with staging. Signs of a bad realtor would include an agent that seems lazy and not Internet savvy.

Signs of a Bad Realtor #3: Does NOT Properly Communicate

Sellers are naturally hyper, and a good Realtor will inform them of his or her availability and communication preferences. If you aren’t presented with something like this right away, you maybe should look for another agent:

“I am available seven days a week by email, phone and/or text. If you contact me before 4:00 p.m., I promise to return your inquiry within four hours. If you contact me after 4:00 p.m., I will be in touch by noon the next day.”

Signs of a bad Realtor would be an agent that doesn’t return calls for days.

Signs of a Bad Realtor #4: Doesn’t Ensure That the Buyer is Qualified

DIY home sellers often make the rookie mistake of taking an offer without vetting the buyer. This can tie up a property for 30 days or more. Your agent needs to make sure that all offers to be considered are from bank pre-qualified buyers, or those that can show they have cash.

For Sale Sign

Signs of a Bad Realtor #5: Poor Negotiation Skills

Think about it — if you and the buyer are $5000 apart on a $400,000 transaction, that $5000 only means an additional $300 in commission for the brokers. The brokers, at that point, may just want to get the deal done and collect their $24,000 commission, and they would probably sacrifice $300 to be able to move on. You, on the other hand, may need that $5000, and a good broker will represent your interest, not his or hers.

Commission Breakdown

Signs of a bad Realtor would be an agent that puts pressure on you to quickly agree to a lower offer.

Signs of a Bad Realtor #6: Doesn’t Attend the Home Inspection

The home inspection carries a lot of weight, and you need to be represented at the inspection. That way, you’ll know what the inspector sees as problems before he sends his report to the buyer. It is better to be surprised early than at the last minute.

Signs of a Bad Realtor #7: Can’t Finalize Loose Ends for Closing

Hearing the words “clear to close” is a great thing, and your agent should be with you every step of the way to help make this happen. He or she needs to be in constant contact with the buyer’s broker, the title company, the bank, and the inspector.

Closing on your house

You’ve made a wise decision if you have hired a Realtor during the home buying process —just make sure you and your broker agree upon expectations.

First Time Home Buyer Checklist

First Time Home Buyer Checklist: 15 Quick Tips

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You’re going to get a lot of advice thrown at you as you attempt to purchase your fist home. Financing, inspections, Realtors, credit scores and many more similar issues will need to be dealt with. First, however, check out the following 15 tips on our first time home buyer checklist:

First Time Home Buyer Checklist

1) Is Real Estate Recession Proof?

First Time Home Buyer Checklist Recession

No, it’s not. If you buy at the top of the market, realize that you may not be able to turn around a year later and make a profit or even get your money out if the economy has tanked. Sure, if you wait long enough things might turn around, but if you need your money quickly in a bad economy, realize that a reasonable sale might take quite a while to consummate.

2) HOA

Thought HOAs were just for those that bought condos? Think again, as buying into a deed restricted community governed by an HOA may mean that you can’t paint your house purple—even if you own it outright. This is an important piece of the first time home buyer checklist. Don’t forget about extra fees!

HOA

3) I Qualified for a $450,000 loan

That’s great, but it doesn’t mean that you have to stretch your budget and buy a $450,000 home. Buy only what you can afford, and don’t pay attention to any higher amount that you have qualified for.

4) Good Money

First time home buyer checklist number four — beware of exotic low-interest, no-interest or no down-payment loans as these can be costly in the future.

5) Check Those Renovations

You may be a woodworking DIY person, but you certainly don’t want to inherit the first-time renovations from the previous accountant owner that couldn’t figure out how to use a reciprocating saw.

6) Location

Pick your location first, and then your home. A perfect home in a bad location really isn’t a perfect home.

7) DIY

If the home your want does need repairs and you are handy, DIY in this case may be a good option. Just make sure you know what you are doing. And of course, a fixer-upper can be purchased at a better price.

8) School District

Unless you are considering private schools, make sure you properly vet the neighborhood schools before you make any offers. Consider using a tool like Niche to find the best schools in your neighborhood or city.

School District

9) Survey

Tell your Realtor you want a current property survey. This will accurately map the borders of your property and help avoid disputes later.

10) Good Inspection

Don’t look at the inspection as possible impediment to closing. A good inspector may find enough things wrong so that you will want to walk away from the deal.

11) Negotiate

Negotiate like you don’t care if you get the house or not. Sure, this is easier said than done, but great negotiators always operate this way.

12) Yard

If the yard is really ugly and you don’t want to rejuvenate it yourself, consider asking the seller to provide a landscaping credit.

Landscape for First Time Home Buyer

13) Low-balling

Don’t look at every home as an opportunity to offer $50,000 less than the asking price. First the sellers—and then your Realtor—will not take you seriously after you establish a pattern of this behavior.

14) Building Plans

Go to the city hall and check upcoming building plans. That way you won’t be surprised when that great park-like open field a block away becomes a 300-unit apartment complex.

15) Extra Cash

Don’t walk away from your closing with the key and no cash left because unforeseen expenses can be counted upon. If we all could make free money, this wouldn’t be an issue, but you need to be careful.

Remember, your first home is a big deal, and we hope our first time home buyer checklist has brought some important points to your attention. And if you are turned down by the bank, don’t give up. Contact us and we will let you know how we can help.

Your Guide To Buying A Foreclosed Home

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Buying a foreclosed home became extremely popular about a decade ago. Why? Well, the problems that began in 2009 led to a meltdown that created scores of opportunities for both investors and previously foreclosed homeowners that wondered if they’d ever purchase a home again after foreclosure. 

Over 5 million homes were foreclosed since then, and many investors have looked upon these as opportunities.

Since HGTV shows like Flip or Flop have become popular, many people think they are familiar with what a foreclosure is, and they think they can make big money by picking off great property values before someone else does. We advise you to be careful.

What is Buying a Foreclosed Home?

When you are looking at a home that is listed as a foreclosure, you need to understand what that means. Is this home in foreclosure, is the seller trying to avoid foreclosure, is someone offering a short sale, or is the property genuinely bank owned?

Buying a Foreclosed Home

How Does Buying A Foreclosed Home Work?

Usually, after a homeowner crosses the 90 day past due mark, the lender will begin the foreclosure process. This simply means that the lender begins the legal work necessary to take back the collateral—the home—that the homeowner placed as security with the lender. Unfortunately for Minnesota debtors, MN foreclosures are many times non-judicial; this means that properties can be taken back outside of the court system. Foreclosures can take a lot longer in judicial foreclosure states like Wisconsin. Our friends at alllaw.com tell us this happens as follows in Minnesota:

Notice of the Foreclosure

In Minnesota, a foreclosing party must give the defaulting borrower the following notices.

Notice of the default. In most cases, the foreclosing party must mail the borrower a written notice of any default before officially starting a foreclosure. The notice must provide the borrower with 30 days to cure the default.

Notice of availability of foreclosure prevention counseling. Along with the notice of default, the foreclosing party must also provide notice that foreclosure prevention counseling services are available and that the homeowner’s contact information will be sent to an approved foreclosure prevention agency.

Notice of sale. To start the foreclosure process, the foreclosing party must first file a notice of the pendency of the foreclosure with the county recorder’s office. After filing the notice of pendency, it must publish a notice of sale for six weeks before the sale. The foreclosing party must also serve a notice of sale to the occupant of the home four weeks prior to the sale.

Foreclosure advice to owners and notice of redemption rights. Along with the notice of sale, the foreclosing party must provide a foreclosure advice notice, which provides information about how to get help, as well as a notice of redemption rights providing information about what happens after the foreclosure sale.

The foreclosure advice notice must also be provided with each subsequent written communication mailed to the borrower. A foreclosing party is deemed to have complied with these requirements if it sends the foreclosure advice notice at least once every 60 days up to the date of the foreclosure sale.

In Foreclosure

So if you are looking at buying a foreclosed home, the actual home shown as “in foreclosure” is probably somewhere in the process described above. If you are interested in a property while it is in foreclosure you have to deal with all parties including the homeowners and all lenders. You can’t make a deal with only one of the parties involved.

Short Sale Forclosure

Short Sale

Sometimes the homeowner gets the lender to agree to a short sale. This means that the lender may agree to take less than what is owed on the property in order to streamline the process and allow the homeowner to avoid a foreclosure appearing on their credit report. These deals can take quite a while to engineer, and again, all parties need to agree.

Bank Owned

When the foreclosure process has been completed and the collateral has been returned to the lender, the home is termed bank-owned. At this point you only need to deal with the bank or its agents, since the bank is the legal property owner.

Forclosed Home

Strategies

Foreclosures, like storage shed content sales, used to be a more quiet and shadowy business. This isn’t the case any longer, however, as foreclosed properties are commonly inundated with multiple offers as many people want to cash in on the misfortunes of others. The best way to attempt to buy a Minnesota foreclosure is with cash.

Once you have located the property you are interested in, do your diligence and find out who actually owns it. Then, if you have the power of a cash offer, you may be able to make a quick deal. Remember, with foreclosure deals we recommend that you get qualified legal help, and please be advised that this article does not constitute legal advice.

If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact us here.

Second Mortgage

A Second Mortgage: Should You Take It Out?

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We know from the economic meltdown that began in 2008 that using your house as an ATM may not be the best idea. A fat line of credit that can be accessed with a debit card or even checks can be quite tempting, but that doesn’t mean that you should automatically think about taking out a second mortgage loan to tap your equity—unless you have a good reason.

Taking Out a Second Mortgage: Not So Good Reasons

You should only borrow money if you need it. That may sound simple, but in some countries, people borrow money simply because they can. Even in the U.S. in the early 2000s, many people based their “wealth” upon the amount of money they could borrow. Some people with only $5000 in savings but with $100,000 of available credit thought they were well off because they had the ability to raise a substantial sum. Therefore, they acted upon any chance to borrow money and loaded up on credit lines. If you are borrowing money only because you can, that’s not a good reason.

Taking Out A Second Mortgage

Taking Out a Second Mortgage: Finances are Tight

This happens for a reason. If you spend more than you make, you will be cash-flow negative, and that will cause you to borrow. If you have amassed considerable credit card debt, it may be very tempting to take out a second mortgage at a lower combined interest rate and pay off those cards. Seven or eight percent is a lot better than 27.9 percent, but if you don’t cut up your cards after you have paid them off, you may not be able to resist the temptation to max them out again.

Finance are Tight

You Just Need Some Breathing Room

Breathing room is great, but if the forces that are suffocating you are not dealt with, you won’t make any progress. If your $800 monthly utility bill is killing you, turn down heat, turn up the A/C, quit watering your lawn or turn out the lights. If you don’t act, you’ll soon see another $800 energy bill, and you’ll have to figure out how to pay that. Borrowing against your home for monthly expenses that you can’t reduce is not a good idea. Instead of this, start looking for the best side hustles that allow for some extra income!

Economic Stimulus

Some Better Reasons for Taking Out a Second Mortgage

There are, however, some good reasons to borrow against your home:

  • You’re starting a business.
  • You want to go back to school and can’t get reasonable student aid or loans.
  • You want to help a family member.
  • You want to start a remodeling project that will increase your home’s value.
  • You want to assist your children with some expenses.
  • You found a great investment opportunity.

Like any other loan, make sure you shop around to get the best terms.

The Contract for Deed Crew

While we don’t do second mortgage loans, we at C4D can assist you with the purchase of your home. We are more flexible and understanding than a lot of banks, and we are experts at using the MN contract for deed as a path for true home ownership. If you have any questions, visit our site. We are here to help!

Minnesota Realtors: More Contract For Deed Deals

1000 500 Sam Radbil

Some Minnesota Realtors view the current economic situation as murky with darker clouds on the horizon. Interest rates are moving higher and some mortgage rates have crossed the psychological five percent barrier. Top luxury home prices in places like Austin, TX have begun to stagnate and actually drop. While unemployment is at record lows, inflation is starting to re-emerge as a threat, the price of oil just recently fell from a six-year record high, and of course there is geo-political chaos. None of these factors are good for the housing market.

Minnesota Realtors Change in Real GDP

The Comeback of No-Doc Type Loans

We are almost 11 years removed from the Great Recession that began in 2008. Some new to the real estate business may have been in their early teens when this occurred and may not remember, but no-interest and no-doc loans were part of the problems that ultimately crashed the economy.

One of our older CD4 clients tells us that they were able to get their original home mortgage with a one-page typewritten business profit and loss statement. The mortgage loan officer said, “Are you making money?” and when he got an affirmative answer, they were approved.

In the early and mid-2000s, people used their homes as ATMs, and loan officers aided by appraisers approved scores of loans. Some were no interest, some were adjustable rate, and many were made without any debt-to-income ratio verification. If someone showed that their business cash flowed significant dollars, profits and income were ignored.

Check Out CNN Lately?

Listen to CNN today and you will hear ads for a mortgage company that claims that profits don’t matter–only cash flow does. When companies can advertise nationally and get customers for low documentation mortgages—even in view of what happened in 2008—it’s time to take notice and get worried.

CNN Real Estate

The Next Time for Minnesota Realtors

The U.S. economy is cyclical, and after the second worst downturn in history, we have now seen the longest recovery. Even though there are those that say “Well, this time is different,” savvy Realtors know that is not true. The next recession–whether it’s almost here or won’t arrive for another year–will cause difficulties for Minnesota Realtors. When the GDP falls, the stock market retreats, and interest rates go up, money tightens and loans can be hard to get. And therefore, you need C4D.

Global Trade Contract For Deed

What We Do

We at C4D use MN contract for deed to help prospective homeowners that were rejected for traditional financing to realize the home ownership dream. We use our strength and knowledge as we buy homes and then resell them to your clients who were rejected for traditional financing or unable to obtain it. Yes, your clients need a job and provable income, but we can work with issues like divorce, tax liens, garnishments, bad credit and large student loan balances. We can help where others have failed.

Listen, we do not want to see an economic downturn, and we genuinely hope that one day all of our clients will be able to get traditional financing. Until that time comes, however, Minnesota Realtors can call us with rejected deals and we’ll see what we can make happen. We’ve helped a lot of people.